China warn Taiwan they will smash them to smithereens as tension soar

China 'will attack Taiwan' warns Shieh Jhy-Wey

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This week, Taiwan has ignored China’s threatening rhetoric as the country seeks new trade ties with the US. Talks for the US-Taiwan Initiative on 21st Century Trade look likely to reach an agreement as both sides say they have “reached consensus on the negotiating mandate”. China will no doubt be angered by the development as Taiwan remains at the centre of heightening hostilities. US Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi sparked the increased tension when she visited Taiwan earlier this month.

Beijing sees Taiwan as one of its own provinces, and was therefore angered by the trip.

In response, Chinese military launched military drills in territory close to Taiwan.

The Chinese Communist Party has regularly threatened its island neighbour, as seen in June when Chinese defence minister Wei Fenghe warned his forces will “not hesitate to start a war” and “smash to smithereens” any attempt to assert Taiwanese independence.

He said: “If anyone dares to split Taiwan from China, the Chinese army will definitely not hesitate to start a war no matter the cost.

“The PLA [People’s Liberation Army] would have no choice but to fight … and crush any attempt of Taiwan independence, safeguarding national sovereignty and territorial integrity.

“Taiwan is China’s Taiwan… Using Taiwan to contain China will never prevail.”

Many experts fear that China will invade Taiwan in the coming years, just as Russia invaded Ukraine.

Joesph Wu, Taiwan’s foreign minister, claimed earlier this month that Chinese military drills were done as preparation for an attack.

He said: “China has used the drills in its military playbook to prepare for the invasion of Taiwan.

“It is conducting large-scale military exercises and missile launches, as well as cyber-attacks, disinformation, and economic coercion, in an attempt to weaken public morale in Taiwan.”

The US has vowed to help defend Taiwan, but reports this week show just how costly a conflict could be for Washington.

The Centre for Strategic and International Studies has released analysis which claims the US could lose 900 warplanes.

Having analysed the militaries of both the US and China, the think tank said both sides would suffer huge losses.

Mark Cancian, a senior adviser at the Centre for Strategic and International Studies, told Insider: “The good news is that at the end of all the iterations so far, there is an autonomous Taiwan.

“The United States and Taiwan are generally successful in keeping the island out of Chinese occupation, but the price of that is very high – losses of hundreds of aircraft, aircraft carriers, and terrible devastation to the Taiwanese economy and also to the Chinese navy and air force.”

On China, he added: “I would say in most scenarios, the Chinese fleet suffers a lot more because it’s very exposed.”

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The UK has also become involved in the Taiwan dispute.

Foreign Secretary Liz Truss criticised China for escalating tensions in Asia.

In response, Beijing’s foreign ministry spokesperson Wang Wenbin said last week: “The UK has mischaracterised the facts and made irresponsible remarks on China’s justified, necessary and lawful move to safeguard national sovereignty and territorial integrity.

“The US is the one who made the provocation first and started the crisis. The DPP [Democratic Progressive Party of Taiwan] authorities have been seeking ‘Taiwan independence’ through soliciting US support.”

He added that it is “legitimate, lawful and justified for China to uphold its territorial integrity and oppose secession”.

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